Thursday, 23 July 2020

Shelves for Life


These shelves are designed to last you a lifetime. The wood will colour, the surfaces will mark and stain and over the years and the furniture will become a part of you. When you die, the shelves can be taken apart and reassembled as a coffin. The brass plate under the bottom shelf, that tells the story about this transformation, is then flipped over and you’re dates inscribed on it.
William Warren

Tuesday, 7 July 2020

Bookwheel

The RIT bookwheel was a thoroughly modern take on a Renaissance design. Before building it, the students designed a 3-D digital model.
Full story at Atlas Obscura

Friday, 19 June 2020

Tiny replica of New York rare bookseller’s gallery


As an object of desire for book collectors, it would be hard to top this replica of rare book dealer John Fleming’s 57th Street Gallery, where he bought and sold in “baronial splendor” according to the New York Times, from 1952 to 1987. Encased in a leaded glass enclosure, the dollhouse-sized library setting features oak bookshelves full of book models, including six “real” miniature books, as well as a silver tea service, a globe, and other plush furnishings that will make some bibliophiles swoon — one of whom will no doubt bid on it at auction on June 23, when it is estimated to reach $1,500-2,500.
Fine Books magazine

Tuesday, 9 June 2020

VAC library

A special project that carries the traditional Vietnamese horticulture, aquaculture & animal husbandry, from rural to urban areas... The VAC Library is also geared towards an open library space for children. Children in the area and elsewhere can come here to play together, read books, and learn about this ecological model visually at the building.
Farming Architects

Thursday, 7 May 2020

Fake wardrobe bookshelves

Hidden bookcase doors are both an attractive and practical addition to any room space but are particularly effective where included as part of a real or false bookcase.
Faux Books

Thursday, 30 April 2020

What Do Famous People’s Bookshelves Reveal?

Bibliophiles do not approach bookshelves lightly. A stranger’s collection is to us a window to their soul. We peruse with judgment, sometimes admiration and occasionally repulsion (Ayn Rand?!). With celebrities now frequently speaking on television in front of their home libraries, a voyeuristic pleasure presents itself: Are they actually really like us?
New York Times

Wednesday, 29 April 2020

Bookcase Credibility

 Bookcase Credibility